Music from Paris
Quantity in Basket: None PASCAL, ARRIEU, MOUQUET, CASADESUS, PIERNÉ, CHAGRI Music from Paris TROY1127 - Price: $16.99
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Sparkling world premiere performances of French music for wind ensemble.

The Atlanta Chamber Winds led by Robert J. Ambrose, offer a sparkling concert of music for wind ensemble by composers who lived and worked in Paris. All but one (the Pierné) are world premiere recordings and offer a substantial addition to the wind ensemble discography. Perhaps most interesting is Francis Chagrin who was born in Bucharest as Alexander Paucker but moved to Paris in 1928 and changed his name. He was most famous for his film music but he also wrote chamber music, two symphonies and songs.
Contents:
Claude Pascal, composer
Octuor pour Instruments à Vent
Atlanta Chamber Winds, Robert J. Ambrose, conductor

Claude Arrieu, composer
Dixtuor pour Instruments à Vent
Atlanta Chamber Winds, Robert J. Ambrose, conductor

Jules Mouquet, composer
Suite
Atlanta Chamber Winds, Robert J. Ambrose, conductor

Fran¨çois Casadesus, composer
London Sketches: Petite Suite Humoristique
Atlanta Chamber Winds, Robert J. Ambrose, conductor

Gabriel Pierné, composer
Pastorale Variée dans le Style Ancien, Op. 30
Atlanta Chamber Winds, Robert J. Ambrose, conductor

Francis Chagrin, composer
Sept Petite Pi¸èces pour 8 Instruments
Atlanta Chamber Winds, Robert J. Ambrose, conductor

Review:
"...No matter the style, though, these are Frenchmen at work, and each piece requires superb technical command, careful balance, sensitivity, energy, and humor. Fortunately, the Atlanta Chamber Winds bring all of this to table and more; each individual is an accomplished professional who shines as a brilliant soloist and yet blends seamlessly into a colorful soundscape. ...Ambrose deserves kudos for putting together a first-rate group and supervising an excellent recording debut." (American Record Guide)

"These performances...are nothing less than impeccable and thoroughly idiomatic; a group of actual French musicians could not improve upon them." (Fanfare)